IAPO’s April newsletter

Welcome to the April issue of our newsletter. This month, we look ahead to the 72nd World Health Assembly (WHA) through the first part of our WHA series. We also highlight the recently published 2019 World Health Statistics which for the first time has its data split along gender lines resulting in very relevant findings. Lastly, we invite you to save the date for our side event at the WHA titled 'Health for all: Gene and cell therapies in Universal Health Coverage'. 

Happy reading!

 

Patient organizations and the World Health Assembly, how does it work?

In the lead up to the 72nd World Health Assembly (WHA) happening between 20 – 28 May, IAPO will be doing a two-part series that aims to provide insight into how the WHO works with patients’ organizatons, the benefits of these collaborations, how they are established as well as the ins and outs of WHA.

 

WHO World health Statistics 2019 published

For the first time, the 2019 global health trends summary report from WHO has split its data by gender. Read more to find out how this approach has highlighted critical differences that affect global health outcomes and how this has impacted the World Health Organization's  recommendations.

Taking up the challenge of ending malaria

After more than a decade of steady progress in fighting malaria, this  progress seems to be stalling. According to the World Health Organization’s latest World malaria report, no significant gains have been made in reducing malaria cases in the period 2015 to 2017. In the lead up to World Malaria Day 2019, there is now a new drive to once again jumpstart the Malaria response with the aim of ending this prevalent public health problem. 

Gene Therapy for β-Thalassaemia approaches European market approval 

Gene therapy continues to evolve with new emerging treatments reaching its promised potential: providing a one-time lifelong cure for even the rarest and most severe of genetic disorders. IAPO member, Thalassaemia International Federation, explores this developments by highlighting the significant conditional approval for the first universal cure for β-thalassaemia. This new treatment will fundamentally change how people with these condition are treated.

Save the date: IAPO's side-event at the 72nd World Health Assembly

Health for all: Gene and cell therapies in Universal Health Coverage

Date: Wednesday 22 May 2019

Time: 13:00 – 14:00

Location: International Red Cross and Red Crescent Museum (Henry Dunant Room), Avenue de la Paix 17, 1202, Geneva

Co-hosted by IAPO, Thalassaemia International Federation and IFPMA (International Federation of Pharmaceutical Manufacturers and Associations), this event will serve to highlight the impact that gene and cell therapies are having and will have on patients' lives within Universal Health Coverage (UHC). It will call upon actors from all sectors to share experiences and ideas on how to use these new therapies to address unmet needs within UHC.

Upcoming Events and Days 

World Hemophilia Day -17 April 2019

World Immunisation week – 24 – 30 April 2019

World Malaria Day – 25 April 2019 

World MS Day – 30 May 2019

World No Tobacco Day – 31 May 2019

Our Upcoming events and days page is an opportunity for you to highlight your key projects and campaigns. The aim of this page is to help you share your work and catalyze positive progress towards achieving patient-centred healthcare at every level in every community.

If you would like your initiative to be featured, email us at rachel@iapo.org.uk 

News from our Partners

Alzheimer’s Disease International (ADI) is undertaking the world’s largest survey on people’s attitudes around dementia, which will form the basis for the World Alzheimer Report 2019, to be released in September. ADI's survey is now open and they want to hear what we all think. Click here to take the survey.

The World Heart Federation has committed to changing the future of Chagas Disease and those it affects. They will do this through launching a Global Roadmap on Chagas Disease in partnership with the Inter-American Society of Cardiology, focusing on the ideal patient pathway of diagnosis and treatment. To help them develop the Chagas Roadmap they are conducting a survey in which we are all invited to participate.